What to do in Lisbon part ii

cont/…

Museu Gulbenkian (Gulbenkian museum)

This delightful collection of Eastern and Western art holds immense appeal even to philistines like me. The priceless art and antiquities on display here will inspire awe in you, at the very least. There is also a café bar in the basement where you can wet your whistle between art periods. I recommend scones and freshly squeezed orange juice in between Flanders and Gainsborough. This is a small but divine collection.

Ponte 25 de Abril (bridge)

Huge and impressive, the 2.3 kilometre Ponte 25 de Abril rises to seventy metres above the  river and links Lisbon with the southern banks of the Tejo. Worth a snap or two.

Museu da Marioneta (puppet museum)

Near the Museu Nacional de Arte Antigao – this divine museum houses puppets and masks from all across the globe. From Turkish shadow puppets to Indonesian puppets and Punch and Judy – this collection, housed in an eighteenth century convent – is curious and beguiling.

Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga

This is Lisbon’s national gallery and contains an immense collection of Porguese paintings from the fifteenth to sixteenth century along with pieces from throughout Europe that span from the fourteenth century up until the present day and a display of applied arts. Located in an exceptionally beautiful seventeenth century palace and with a lovely café and sculpture park with views of the river. Click here to see pictures of the sculpture garden.

The Se

Lisbon’s cathedral was founded in the eleventh century and is a celebration of the city’s reconquest from the Moors, which explains its appearance. More exciting on the outside than in.

Trams

Don’t even think of going home before going on at least one tram ride. Lisbon is a city of steep hills with some of the steepest gradients of any city and whilst your thighs will (eventually at least) thank you for the exercise, taking one of the iconic yellow trams should figure high if not top (just below pastel de nata) on your list of things to do in Lisbon. The number 28 is one of the best apparently which you can take from Martim Montiz (near the teatro). The trips aren’t cheap considering the cost of public transport in Portugal, but worth it for the experience. If you’re lucky you will spot some free-riders – cyclists holding on to the back of the tram as it ascends the gradients. Click here to see pictures of the 28 tram ride journey.

Further afield – Sintra

Worth leaving the city for, if you have the chance don’t rob yourself of the opportunity to experience the verdant magic of Sintra. You would need two days to really take in all the sights that this wooded idyll has to offer.

Click here to go back to part i of what to do in Lisbon.

One thought on “What to do in Lisbon part ii

  1. Pingback: What to do in Lisbon part i | Portugal in a Campervan

Comments are closed.

What to do in Lisbon part ii

cont/…

Museu Gulbenkian (Gulbenkian museum)

This delightful collection of Eastern and Western art holds immense appeal even to philistines like me. The priceless art and antiquities on display here will inspire awe in you, at the very least. There is also a café bar in the basement where you can wet your whistle between art periods. I recommend scones and freshly squeezed orange juice in between Flanders and Gainsborough. This is a small but divine collection.

Ponte 25 de Abril (bridge)

Huge and impressive, the 2.3 kilometre Ponte 25 de Abril rises to seventy metres above the  river and links Lisbon with the southern banks of the Tejo. Worth a snap or two.

Museu da Marioneta (puppet museum)

Near the Museu Nacional de Arte Antigao – this divine museum houses puppets and masks from all across the globe. From Turkish shadow puppets to Indonesian puppets and Punch and Judy – this collection, housed in an eighteenth century convent – is curious and beguiling.

Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga

This is Lisbon’s national gallery and contains an immense collection of Porguese paintings from the fifteenth to sixteenth century along with pieces from throughout Europe that span from the fourteenth century up until the present day and a display of applied arts. Located in an exceptionally beautiful seventeenth century palace and with a lovely café and sculpture park with views of the river. Click here to see pictures of the sculpture garden.

The Se

Lisbon’s cathedral was founded in the eleventh century and is a celebration of the city’s reconquest from the Moors, which explains its appearance. More exciting on the outside than in.

Trams

Don’t even think of going home before going on at least one tram ride. Lisbon is a city of steep hills with some of the steepest gradients of any city and whilst your thighs will (eventually at least) thank you for the exercise, taking one of the iconic yellow trams should figure high if not top (just below pastel de nata) on your list of things to do in Lisbon. The number 28 is one of the best apparently which you can take from Martim Montiz (near the teatro). The trips aren’t cheap considering the cost of public transport in Portugal, but worth it for the experience. If you’re lucky you will spot some free-riders – cyclists holding on to the back of the tram as it ascends the gradients. Click here to see pictures of the 28 tram ride journey.

Further afield – Sintra

Worth leaving the city for, if you have the chance don’t rob yourself of the opportunity to experience the verdant magic of Sintra. You would need two days to really take in all the sights that this wooded idyll has to offer.

Click here to go back to part i of what to do in Lisbon.

One thought on “What to do in Lisbon part ii

  1. Pingback: What to do in Lisbon part i | Portugal in a Campervan

Comments are closed.